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"An Arrest by the Rebels-The Contraband Troops-Re-enlistment of Veterans- items from the North Carolina Press," New York Times, January 13, 1864

Title

"An Arrest by the Rebels-The Contraband Troops-Re-enlistment of Veterans- items from the North Carolina Press," New York Times, January 13, 1864

Description

A re-enlistment report out of Beaufort, NC. This piece is intended to portray the mentality of North Carolininians under Union occupancy. Discussed the massed troops within the area and the high rate of re-enlistment for Union occupied North Carolina. Includes excerpts from three local newspapers, The Times, the Raleigh Standard, and The Raleigh Progress. The three articles include the discussion of state moral, which seemingly makes North Carolinians, "ripe for revolt," against Richmond. Also discussed is the demoralization of confederate troop, as well as, the shutdown of federal services in western North Carolina due to unionist tendencies.

Creator

New York Times

Source

"An Arrest by the Rebels-The Contraband Troops- Re-enlistment of Veterans- items from the North Carolina Press," New York Times, January 13, 1864, Proquest, accessed February 20, 2012, http://search.proquest.com/docview/91847796?accountid=12725.

Date

1864-01-13

Type

Document

Coverage

Beaufort, North Carolina
Beaufort County, North Carolina

Original Format

Newspaper Article

Text

From North Carolina.

An Arrest by the Rebels-The Contraband Troops- Re-enlistment of Veterans- items from the North Carolina Press.

Newbern, NC. Jan 7

The Second regiment of North Carolina Union volunteers is rapidly organizing. Its headquarters are at Beaufort, N.C.

Perry Carter, a prominent Unionist and influential citizen of Murfreesboro, N.C., was arrested a few days ago by Confederate soldiery and sent to Weldon, charged with reasonable correspondence with the public enemy. So great was the indignation excited by this new outrage upon the rights and liberties of the citizen, that Mr. Carter was immediately released and returned to his home in Murfreesboro Mr.Carter is the father-in-law of Charles Henry Foster.


New Bern, N.C. Saturday, Jan,9.

The Fifty-eight Pennsylvania volunteers, stationed in this Department, have reenlisted for the war, and will soon leave for home on a furlough.

Several batteries have also reenlisted, as well as a majority of the men belonging to the varying regiments. If the Government continues its liberal bounties, all the old, regiments will be ready to take the field by Spring, with full ranks.

The new loyal paper published here, the North Carolina Time, contains the following items:

“there are more than a hundred thousand people today within our military lines, who are entitled to the protection of the National Government by every consideration of humanity and good faith.”

In referring to the proposed separation of North Carolina form the rebel Confederacy, the Times says:
“The people of the State are ripe for a revolt against the Richmond Government, but are almost helpless, in the consequence of the withdrawal of some sixty thousand of her sons into other states; their spirit, however, is not cowed thereby.

The Leaders of this movement advocated a separate sovereignty, as we understand it, and not a return to the Union preferable to the present state of affairs in Dixie. We have almost daily evidence of this fact from the large number who come within our lines and avail themselves of the President’s Amnesty proclamation. If our troops would hold our railroads and avenues of approach into the State, the Old North State would be in the union, not only by conquest, but of her own free will and accord.

The number of citizens in this city who have availed themselves of the President’s Amnesty Proclamation, by taking the oath and parole therein laid down, number about 1,110.”

The Raleigh (N.C.) Progress says:
“A monstrous proposition.- the beauties of secession, but dimly seen at first, are becoming more and more vivid as the revolution advances, and from present indications it will not be long before he who runs may read. The communication of officers of the Army of Tennessee, read in the House of Representatives on Tuesday, shows there is an alarming state of demoralization and disaffection in that quarter.
If There is to be a dictator, mr. Foote wats Gen. Lee. We have as much confidence in, and respect for , Gen. lee as any man living, but we tell Mr. Foote that the people of North Carolina, who set out to fight for freedom and liberty, will not submit to a Dictator in the person of any living man, while the power is left to resist.”

The Raleigh (N.C.) Standard says:
“The people in the extreme western counties of North Carolina have been deprived of all mail facilities, on the grounds of disloyalty to the Confederate government.”



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New York Times, "An Arrest by the Rebels-The Contraband Troops-Re-enlistment of Veterans- items from the North Carolina Press," New York Times, January 13, 1864, Civil War Era NC, accessed April 30, 2017, http://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/items/show/18.