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Letter from Charles Manly to David L. Swain, October 4, 1856

Title

Letter from Charles Manly to David L. Swain, October 4, 1856

Description

In the following letter Charles Manly, the University's Board of Trustees' secretary-treasurer, wrote to David Swain, University President, informing him about a recent board meeting and filling him in on the opinion of the trustees regarding Hedrick’s recent political essay in the Standard. A resolution was put forward at the meeting that would either force Hedrick to resign from his position at the university; however he chose not to resign than he would be dismissed. Upon hearing the opinions of other trustees at the meeting, however, the resolution was withdrawn and the committee decided to let Swain try to convince Hedrick to resign. In the letter Manly states his personal feelings about Hedrick, stating if Hedrick has any self-respect he will leave voluntarily. If Hedrick, “wishes to be dismissed; that he may fly to Yankeedom as the great proscribed; & find refuge in the bosom of Black Republicans with the blood of martyrdom streaming from his skirts, then he will not resign but will wait to be kicked out.” Manly closed the letter by remarking that he wished as little damage should be done to both Hedrick and the institution.

Creator

Charles Manly

Source

"Letter from Charles Manly to David L. Swain, October 4, 1856," Benjamin Sherwood Hedrick's Views on Slavery and Dismissal from the University, Documenting the American South, The University Library, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, http://www.docsouth.unc.edu/unc/unc08-14/unc08-14.html (accesssed on February 13, 2012).

Date

1856-10-4

Contributor

Miller, Jennifer

Type

Document

Coverage

Raleigh, North Carolina
Wake County, North Carolina

Original Format

Correspondence

Text

RaleighOct. 4/56

My Dear Gov,

After stating that I send you enclosed a Copy of the Proceedings of the Executive Committee, had today & a Copy of Mons Herrisse's BIll of Indictment against the Faculty, & an expression of my opinion that when the Prisoners shall have made their defence that the "Informer & Prosecutor will be ordered to pay the costs" & be without a day in Court.
 
The residue of this epistle is strictlyprivate & confidential.
 
The political essay of Prof Hedrick which appeared in the Standard yesterday has given great pain to the Trustees & Friends of the University. No apology nor justificatiion has been heard in his defence. At the meeting of the Executive Com. today a resolution was offered requesting him to resign & in case of refusal to dismiss him peremptorily.
 
But other counsels prevailed. The opinions & advise of other Trustees here, not members of the Committee, were heard, the resolution was withdrawn & it was finally agreed unanimously that you shall be requested to use your influence in persuading him to resign. Indeed, I was requested to go up to the Hill & to cooperate with you in bringing about this result. But my health is bad, I have little acquaintance with Mr. Hedrick & I can't see what I could do by going.
 
If he has any sensibility or proper self respect an intimation that it is the wish of the Trustees that he shall resign will be sufficient; but if he wishes to be dismissed; that he may fly to Yankeedom as the great Proscribed; & find refuge in the bosom of Black Republicans with the blood of martyrdomstreaming from his skirts, then he will not resign but will wait to be kicked out. I hope therefore that you will put on your  Diplomatic Cap & manage this thing right.
If it were not so painful for me to sit up long & write, I would give you a full page on the utter want of tact, good taste, prudence, & common sense in Hedrick's writing & publishing such an essay on the eve of a heated political campaign.
 
He is without excuse & is bound to go overboard, but the thing is to do this with the least damage to him & with the least noise & damage to the Institution.
Let me hear from you soon upon this subject.

Faithfully your friend,

Charles Manly                          

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Citation

Charles Manly , Letter from Charles Manly to David L. Swain, October 4, 1856, Civil War Era NC, accessed May 26, 2017, https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/items/show/254.