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“Are the Robeson County, N.C., outlaws KuKlux?,” New York Times, May 16, 1871

Title

“Are the Robeson County, N.C., outlaws KuKlux?,” New York Times, May 16, 1871

Description

In the brief note from the New York Times, there is a clear and concise clarification regarding criminal activity, and with whom these perpetrators are. Within the report, the Associated Press declared that the Ku Klux Klan were the outlaws of the respective crime, though no information is given in regards to the crime committed. This would have given innocence to the more idealistic group, the “Lowry” Gang in that they had the more prominent reputation in the region. However, due to their membership and the ethnical diversity in which their group was comprised from, they would not have been remotely associated with the KuKlux Klan, due to the lack of racial diversity in that group’s organization.

Creator

New York Times

Source

"Are the Robeson County, N.C., outlaws KuKlux?", The Lumbee Indians, Appalachian State University, accessed 1/18/2012, http://linux.library.appstate.edu/lumbee/33/ARE0001.htm

Date

1871-05-16

Type

Document

Coverage

Wilmington, North Carolina
Robeson Count, North Carolina

Text

The statement made in some of the Northern papers, based on a telegram of the Associated Press, sent from this point May 10, that the Robeson County outlaws are Kuklux is erroneous. LOWRY, APPLEWHITE and STRONG, the recognized leaders of the badn, are all negroes, and it is not known that a single whiteman is connected with the band.

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Citation

New York Times, “Are the Robeson County, N.C., outlaws KuKlux?,” New York Times, May 16, 1871, Civil War Era NC, accessed May 28, 2017, https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/items/show/33.